How do I know if I have androgenetic alopecia?

They each have a characteristic pattern of hair loss: Male pattern hair loss: Hair loss starts above the temples. The whole hairline recedes into an “M” shape. Hair at the top of the head also thins.

How do I know if I have androgenic alopecia?

Signs of androgenetic alopecia include the following:

  1. Gradual onset.
  2. Increased hair shedding.
  3. Transition in the involved areas from large, thick, pigmented terminal hairs to thinner, shorter, indeterminate hairs and finally to short, wispy, nonpigmented vellus hairs.

Does androgenetic alopecia happen suddenly?

It can occur suddenly or develop gradually over time. Sudden-onset causes include illness, diet, medications, and childbirth. Alopecia that has a gradual onset more likely has a genetic component.

What triggers androgenic alopecia?

Androgenic alopecia can be caused by a variety of factors tied to the actions of hormones, including some ovarian cysts, taking high androgen index birth control pills, pregnancy, and menopause.

How do you rule out androgenetic alopecia?

The diagnosis is usually based on a thorough history and a focused physical examination. In some patients, selected laboratory tests or punch biopsy may be necessary. Topically administered minoxidil is labeled for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in women.

Does hair grow back with androgenetic alopecia?

But hair loss that continues — and gets worse — could indicate alopecia. The two most common forms of alopecia are alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia. … It can affect people of all ages and genders, but the good news is that hair often grows back on its own with the help of immune-suppressing medication.

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Can androgenetic alopecia be stopped?

No, there is no cure for androgenetic alopecia. However, the progression of this condition in both men and women tends to be very slow, spanning several years to decades. An earlier age of onset may predict a quicker rate of progression.

Can alopecia go away on its own?

Alopecia areata (AA) causes hair loss in small, round patches that may go away on their own, or may last for many years. Nearly 2% of the U.S. population (about four million people) will develop AA in their lifetime.

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