What are the dangers of Microblading?

Since microblading breaks the skin, there is a serious risk for transmission of infectious diseases, including HIV and bacterial skin infections. Unsterile tools and other equipment are among the leading risks for transmitting infection.

Why microblading is a bad idea?

The primary (and scariest) problem with microblading is that the procedure cuts the skin in order to deposit the pigment. Any time your skin is cut there is a serious risk of infection and scar tissue.

Who should not get microblading?

If you have any kind of skin condition on or near your eyebrows. This includes eczema, shingles, rashes, or anything else near eyebrows. Taking Blood Thinners such as: Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Coumadin etc.

Why you shouldn’t get your eyebrows Microbladed?

“Clients with large pores and oily skin aren’t good candidates for microblading because the color doesn’t show up well and can look blurry,” says Jeffrey Lyle Segal of Paul Labrecque Salon. “And those with rosacea have a tendency to bleed too much.”

Does microblading ruin your natural brows?

In short, no. Although there are some considerations which we’ll get into more below, it doesn’t seem that semi-permanent brow procedures have any kind of lasting effect on the way your natural hair grows, even when it seems your entire brow needs to be reshaped.

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When should you not do microblading?

MICROBLADING IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR ANYONE WHO IS OR HAS THE FOLLOWING:

  • Sick with cold, flu, or sinus/respiratory infection (please reschedule your appointment and stay home to recover)
  • Skin irritations including: sunburn, rash, eczema, shingles, acne, or psoriasis near the treated area.
  • Pregnant or nursing.
  • Under age 18.

Should I tip my microblading artist?

In reality, you shouldn’t tip the microblading artist. If you don’t tip you look cheap, if you tip, you’ll get broke.

Why is my microblading turning GREY?

The skin’s natural healing process is to react to tattooing in general as if there has been an invasion. The skin responds with healing over the implanted pigment creating a temporary “haze” over the pigment.

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